Simple Ideas

NaNo a No No

Writing | November 12, 2011

My brother, bless his heart, stuck his toe in the NaNoWriMo pool this November.

November, was a good call for this project. It has a couple of strategically placed national holidays. That frees up the working folks who compromise most of the talent pool for this process. Professional writers rarely try this approach. Although now and then, a publishable product will arise from the ashes if this month.

The "central problem" facing most of the writers is the omnipresent word count. Quanity is the goal, you need 50,000 words to qualify. That is roughly 1,667 a day. To be safe, most folks try to get ahead of the power curve and bank a couple big days early in the month.

A good typer can crank out the daily minimum in 2 hours.

My brother knocked out 1,800 in under an hour.

There is no doubt he can crank out the words in the allotted time period. Even with a job and domestic chores and hours spent in his basement perfecting his impression of a recliner. Even with all this, it is very doable.

Except for one small problem.

He writes by not writing. That is to say, he spends a lot of time thinking, planning, plotting, figuring out what he is going to write. Not saying that is bad. We all work in different ways. Finding the way that works for you is the key.

This is the day after Veteran's Day. Veterans Day was the day he was going to format the 2011 book that we are working on. It's now the day after and the formatting is still on the recliner to do list.

In the interim, he killed a deer. Not with a gun, it was a government vehicle. 8 pointer, before the impact. Afterwards...not so much. I don't know if he's working on the book or not as that is also another part of this style, to not announce progress in process, it doesn't exist until it's finished.

The central problem with NaNo writing is the same for most people. Unless you have some sort of typing OCD issus, the problem is the daily word count. That was the problem for me. Hitting the daily numbers resulted in me going from my usual state of sleep deprived to the even worse state of sleep depraved.

We turn the clocks back in November too, so the month is an hour longer. The writers get every benefit of the clock and calender. But the central problem is still the same, crank out the words.

I'm pretty sure I'd have never finished a piece that long were it not for this national effort. But thinking back, it was a horror of a month

I can't imagine me ever doing this again willingly. Or on a bet. Perhaps if it were somehow tied to national security, I'd think about it. A little more likely if the future of the human race depended on it. Ok, fine, put the Universe on it, I'm practically there.

But not this year.


Any Comments?

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