Simple Ideas

Unintended Science Project

Blogging | July 2, 2011

I cooked $300 worth of wine yesterday.

Not in a meal, in the trunk of my car.

The results were very similar to this post.

http://www.wineloverspage.com/wineadvisor/tswa010618.shtml

My initial thought was that I'd be looking at some really expensive vinegar. But I started immediate triage. I chilled those bottles down as fast as possible. Then opened and drank with similar haste.

Turns out, the wine is quite drinkable. In fact one wine that I'd normally age for another 5 years was tasting better than ever after being cooked for a day.

The biggest long term problem with cooked wine is the oxidation. I cooked about 4 bottles in the 06 time frame and I didn't know it until 08. None of those were drinkable. The problem is exacerbated by the foil around the top of the bottles. If you just have mild overheating, the wine will just creep out the top and you can't see it because of the foil, so as an owner you let the problem get worse.

Without the foil it would be obvious you had a problem and you would open the damaged bottles and drink them as quickly as possible. In effect, you are hyper aging and decanting the when you cook it, as was pointed out in the above article.

I know the cork and foil is there for a reason, but the reason is to help sell the wine, not help the consumer. My suggestion is to strip that foil off any wine that is shipped in summer (I have lots in transit.) And the second thing is to gravitate to wines with screw tops.

I just joined a wine club in Oregon that has screw tops on all thier regular size bottles of Pinot. Eventually, the industry will be doing the customer a service as more of the major producers move this way.

Cheers!


Any Comments?

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